Tá for Grá—Yes for Equality

By: Ryan Wilzoch

If you hadn’t heard, Ireland voted on its same-sex referendum on Friday, May 22nd. International Wit had the unique opportunity to visit Ireland just before the vote. It was difficult finding humorous posters and advertisements on such a serious topic. Luckily, we got a tip from an awesome professor who found the perfect video of comedians from all over the world using humor to support marriage equality.

The video linked below is a variety of comedians from all over the world, all supporting the marriage referendum. South African comedian, Trevor Noah said same-sex marriage needed to be legalized so the pain and suffering of marriage can be shared equally among all people. Jack Dee, an English comedian pretends as if he is repulsed not only by same-sex marriage, but heterosexual marriage as well, claiming a woman and man together make him “sick.”

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Dublin Stand-ups

By: Julia Sprowls 

We’ve been studying and analyzing humor differences for an entire semester now, and on Monday night we finally got to experience the humor firsthand.

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A classic Dublin pub called Stag’s Head hosted a free comedy show called Comedy Crunch in its basement. The opening acts were Irish and British, and the headliner, Michael Harrison, was Canadian. It was a small venue, so the comedians interacted with the crowd throughout the show. Our group of American tourists stood out against the crowd, so we had the chance to say where we were from and why we were there. Each of the five stand-up comedians made jokes about the Americans in the crowd and Americans in general. Actually, most of the jokes involved racism. Each comedian made fun of themselves as well as other races and ethnicities they knew were in the crowd. As the show went on, our research was confirmed when we heard the Irish dry humor. We heard the comedians making fun of themselves, just as we learned earlier in the semester from our interviews.

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A Gambling Company Risks It All

By: Julia Sprowls

We’ve all heard those commercials for lottery tickets and casinos that make gambling sound fun and exciting, and then end with a telephone number to call if you have a gambling problem or addiction. That’s about the extent of in-your-face gambling advertisements we see here in the United States. The story is a little different in Ireland and England. A bookmaker company, Paddy Power, is often at the center of controversy with its guerilla marketing strategies.

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A Little Piece of Irish Land

By: Karianne Johnsen and Danie Minor 

For  €20 or $25 a piece, anyone with a love for Ireland can dig their roots into one square of Irish land with a certificate of land ownership thanks to a company called Irish Landowner. Whether its a portion of Muckish Mountain, Moyra Glebe, Falcarragh, or County Donegal, Ireland, Irish Landowner allows the public to have a unique experience with the country they love!

At the end of 2014, Irish Landowner released a commercial to promote its product! From an American standpoint, one might not think this commercial as funny, but to an Irish citizen it has everything they’d want to see. According to an article posted in the Independent.ie by Karen Creed, Irish citizens favor humor that can make them laugh at themselves. The advertisement’s main actress fulfills the typical Irish stereotype of a curly, red-haired woman frolicking the town to Irish music by step-dancing in a solo dress and “ghillies” (also known as soft dance shoes).

In the article, an American named Katie Markese gave her opinion of Irish humor stating she finds the Irish to be “funny in a sarcastic or caustic kind of way” and that they are “naturally funny.” Creed also states the reason Irish humor works so well is because it is loosely based on either making fun of yourself or others in a “poking fun” kind of way rather than mean.

This commercial captures the overall goal of Irish Landowner, which is to give someone the opportunity to emburse themselves in Irish culture and its heritage by own a piece of Ireland. The ad embodies the “known” Irish persona in a very funny and creative way!

ADventure: Buy it? Or leave it?

By: Ryan Wilzoch

ADventure: Episode 1
International Wit decided to try something different this week. Our Account Executive, Ryan, decided to do a mock talk show called, “ADventure.” ADventure will play a variety of mini-games. This week ADventure’s mini-game was called, “Buy it? Or leave it?” Special guests tell us if they would buy an item or leave it on the shelf after seeing its ads.

The ad campaign this week was by Hunky Dory Potato Chips. The ad was originally used in Ireland to support Gaelic Football. The ads exploit women to a great extent. You may be surprised at our special guests reactions to these ads. Please be cautious as you watch this video for it does get a little spicy.

Humor vs. Humour

By: Julia Sprowls

Welcome to International Wit! This website is dedicated to analyzing the differences in advertising humor among the U.S., England and Ireland.

Perceptions of humor vary from country to country. International brand’s often must change their ads and campaigns based on where it will be shown because humor is so culturally specific. Our team of five’s purpose is to highlight these ads and the differences.

We, advertising and public relations students of Kent State University, will be traveling to these countries at the end of our semester in May. Until then, our team will be visiting communication agencies, attending a Global Ad and PR class and speaking with specialists in these areas. Along the way we’ll be posting about funny campaigns and advertisements and reviewing the uses of humor in each.

According to a Millward Brown study, some form of humor is used in almost half of all TV advertising. Humor can make ads more enjoyable, involving, and memorable. If humor is not used effectively, it can distract viewers from the overall message and reverse its main goal.

Historically, America is known for being less satirical and more obvious in its jokes. America likes slapstick humor, deliberately clumsy actions and embarrassing moments, whereas Britain tends to use more sarcasm and dark undertones according to a Lexio Philes article. We’re about to find out for ourselves! Visit our blog each week for new content and examples.

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